Toxoplasmosis and the associated retinochoroiditis: important facts and when to treat

Annie SeeWah Tung provides an overview of toxoplasmosis retinochoroiditis, including guidance on which cases should be treated and the treatment options. Toxoplasmosis retinochoroiditis is an infectious condition that is characterised by retinochoroidal lesions commonly in the posterior pole and is...

Corneal dystrophies simplified

Based on biomicroscopic and histopathologic features, corneal dystrophies can be broadly classified into epithelial, Bowman’s layer / anterior stromal, stromal, and endothelial dystrophies. Corneal dystrophies are a group of inherited, bilateral, gradually progressing, non- inflammatory conditions caused by accumulation of...

Training on the go

In this guide, we aim to provide trainees with novel ideas to maximise learning in the workplace to make the most of your working hours and balance the multiple demands on your time. They say time flies; and it really...

The Arclight: A ‘pocket’ ophthalmoscope to revitalise undergraduate teaching?

Ophthalmoscopy should be a core skill for every doctor and should be firmly embedded in the undergraduate curriculum similar to the unquestioned position of the stethoscope. The simplicity of the Arclight means it is easy to useand, importantly, to learn...

The approach to angle-closure glaucoma

Further to my last article in Eye News (print issue) describing the diagnostic approaches to various clinical scenarios in glaucoma, the approach to angle-closure glaucoma (ACG), a situation terrifying for patient and registrar alike, will be discussed. Please refer to...

The approach to trabeculectomy postoperative complications

Performing a trabeculectomy is like giving birth to a baby. It may be traumatic and there is scope for devastating error but once the operation is completed only then does the real work begin. The bleb must be nurtured into...

The treachery of images – making sense of OCT imaging

In 1929 Belgian surrealist Rene Magritte produced his painting La Trahison des Images. It depicted an old fashioned pipe for smoking tobacco and underneath were the words “ceci n’est pas une pipe”, this is not a pipe. You may wonder...

The medical student syndrome

It is often said that “a little learning is a dangerous thing,” but being super savvy can’t put us at the brink of harm, can it? Each year as thousands of students commence their medical degrees, they begin a journey...

Unravelling ocular motility

Ocular motility can often be a slightly abstract concept during the earlier years of ophthalmology training. A large variance on what embodies normality; mythical concepts like fusion and binocular vision, examination techniques that can be fiddly, and complex neuroanatomy all...

Embryology in clinical practice

The fascinating world of embryology is both beautiful and practical. It is a home video of our evolutionary history through the ages from the single cell through to the life aquatic, the development of gut, limbs and brain, and most...

The embryology of the eye

Nobody claims to like embryology. At least nobody I know. It has been a neglected part of the curriculum since time immemorial and a vicious cycle occurs in which those with an incomplete understanding fail to appreciate the inherent beauty...

The assessment of pupils and 
pupillary reactions

Understanding pupillary reactions is vital in understanding basic neuro-opthalmology. It is a skill required in eye casualty, clinics and perhaps most importantly, exams. To start at the beginning, the pupil is the central aperture of the iris, its size controlling...