A practical guide to anisocoria

Anisocoria means the presence of difference in the size of the right and left pupils. It is a sign of an abnormality in the efferent pathway. The first question facing the ophthalmologist is to ascertain if anisocoria is present or...

Diagnosis and management of IV cranial nerve palsy

Aetiology: Trochlear nerve palsy can be divided into acute or congenital. Congenital trochlear nerve palsy is usually noted in childhood with development of abnormal head posture. Various pathologies can lead to acute IV nerve palsy, most commonly trauma. Other causes...

Third nerve palsy

Case scenarios A 71-year-old female presented to a nearby eye emergency unit with two days history of partial ptosis in her left eye with diplopia. She saw her GP earlier that day and he asked her to go to the...

Typical and atypical optic neuritis – diagnosis and initial management

Optic neuritis is a relatively common presentation to ophthalmologists in the acute setting. The vast majority are cases of ‘typical’ optic neuritis (ON) but a smaller group of conditions, so-called, ‘atypical’ optic neuritides require a different work-up and management strategy....

The perfect interview to land the dream consultant job

Eight top tips for consultant interviews: 1. A person is not just an ophthalmologist. Trusts are appointing the person not just the ophthalmologist. On a consultant interview panel (AAC) there will be non-ophthalmologists (e.g. medical director, chief executive, lay chair)...

  • 1
  • 2 (current)