Human factors in the operating room

The importance of minimising human error in surgery is well established. This was initially sparked by lessons learned from the aviation industry in the 1970s after several fatal flight accidents [1]. This became a catalyst for a movement on training...

A trainee’s guide on how to prepare for the digital age of ophthalmology

As the pandemic rolls on, the past year has left many ophthalmic departments in disarray with ever-lengthening patient waiting-lists and increasing challenges in service delivery. Areas such as virtual clinics, telephone / video consultations have had to mature rapidly to...

Tips for the Online Proctored FRCOphth - Part 1

The FRCOphth Part 1 examination is a difficult exam in itself, testing candidates on a wide range of theoretical and biomedical ophthalmology. This used to be a two-part pencil-on-paper written examination, which was then digitalised for October 2019 and January...

Keep calm and cut the carbon – improving sustainability in ophthalmology

As I dump my tenth pair of gloves into a non-recyclable clinical waste bin; dispose of another handful of plastic minims; or print another wad of single-sided discharge paperwork after a cataract surgery, the inconvenient truth of how these seemingly...

How the other half live – ophthalmology training around the world

Ophthalmology speciality training is currently seven years in the UK without an additional fellowship. UK trainees are privileged to have a training programme that is held in high esteem across the world, but did you ever wonder what other trainees...

Optimising an acute eye service in the current COVID-19 crisis

With the current global pandemic of COVID-19 we have all had to redesign and reorganise our normal working practices. Non-urgent hospital work has been postponed to allow redistribution of resources, redeployment of hospital staff and to reduce the risk of...

The orthoptic report – what does it all mean?

An orthoptist report may well look like a piece of Japanese Shodo, however, it does in fact contain some extremely useful information. This piece will briefly explain some of the common brush strokes seen on a report. There is some...

An interview with Professor John Forrester

What made you choose ophthalmology as a career and how did your interest in academia develop? During Medical School at Glasgow University, I was getting progressively disillusioned with the career options while my colleagues and friends all seemed to quickly...

Certifying patients as visually impaired: the start of a journey

In March 2017 there were 290,475 people registered as either visually impaired or severely visually impaired in the UK [1]. Patients registered as sight impaired benefit from financial support as well as practical help. Practical help is provided by social...

How to pass the Refraction Certificate

Unfortunately, I had the pleasure of getting to know this exam intimately. With adequate preparation this does not have to be the case for most people. The exam has recently changed to consist of 10 OSCE style stations (previously 12)....

Useful digital resources for the modern ophthalmologist

In the age of the internet and a smartphone at everyone’s fingertips, here are some free resources I have found to be useful on the job, and hopefully will be of use to you too. Feedly (Android/iOS): Better known as...

A near miss

A 55-year-old gentleman presented with a ‘blurry patch’ to his left eye which he had noticed for the past two months. The visual acuity with correction was 6/5 in the right eye and 6/6 in the left eye on the...